The New Mexico Landscape Pavilion is an experimental design that merges photography and architecture, in an attempt to create a new kind of aesthetic experience for those who encounter it.

Panoramic Photos of two opposing mountain ranges (the Jemez mountains and the Sangre de Cristo mountains) were taken on a hilltop with a digital camera near Santa Fe New Mexico on a specific day, along with photos of the sky at that same time.

These photos were enlarged and printed onto fabric. The enlarged printed fabric photos were mounted onto eight curved steel frames, supported by twelve steel support columns. Eight of the photos of the mountain ranges were mounted onto both sides of the lower curved frames, and eight photos of the sky were mounted onto both sides of the top curved frames. 

Conceptually, the landscape was deconstructed and frozen in time with the photographs, and reconstructed in a new way with the curved panels, in order to create the New Mexico Landscape Pavilion.

Status: Unbuilt 

Michael Jantzen

Michael Jantzen

Artist and designer based in California, who combines art, architecture, technology and sustainability. Jantzen's works often explore the public space, by creating installations that use sun and wind as energy sources.

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